It’s that time of the day again…the Bismarck/North Dakota Top 10 Fun Facts!

  1. Bismarck was established in 1872 and was originally named ‘Edwinton’ as a tribute to Edwin M. Johnson, who was a prominent engineer for the Northern Pacific Railway company. Before a year went by the town was renamed Bismarck after the German chancellor Otto Von Bismarck in order to entice German immigrants and trade to move to the town. It worked: almost 60% of the c. 61000 population is of German descent. 14% are of Norwegian descent; herre god! And Justin, my host, is of Polish descent (1.3% of the population).
  2. COOL FACT ALERT!!! The town of Rugby in North Dakota is the geographical centre of North America. A 15 feet tall rock obelisk, flanked by poles flying the United States and Canadian flags, marks the location. Holy mackerel; check out the link….Rugby looks like an interesting kinda place…
  3. Bismarck experienced significant growth beginning in 1874 due to gold being discovered in the Black Hills.
  4. North Dakota is the most rural of all the states, with farms covering more than 90% of the land. North Dakota ranks first in the nation’s production of spring and durum wheat.
  5. Before the arrival of white settlers, present-day central North Dakota was inhabited by the Mandan Native American tribe; the Hidatsa name for Bismarck is mirahacii arumaaguash (“Place of the tall willows”). That name is way nicer than ‘Bismarck’.
  6. TOP FACT ALERT!!! Paula Broadwell, a bestselling author and extramarital partner of David Petraeus (ex-Director of the CIA), is from Bismarck. Why, oh why did she do it? Maybe it was his dashing good looks? Or, more likely, the power-trip that came with getting with the boss of the CIA…
  7. GEOLOGY FACT ALERT!!! Geologically speaking, Hillsboro is located in a large, flat, and ancient dried lake bottom surrounded by some of the most fertile farmland in the world.
  8. The North Dakota State University research experiment station in Hettinger is the largest state owned sheep research centre in the United States. I assume this is some sort of joke….?
  9. The state beverage is milk. I’m not making this up…
  10. 10. I’m in Bismarck, North Dakota!!!
North Dakota's official flag was adopted in 1911. The flag has a blue field and pictures a bald eagle holding a red ribbon in its bill; the ribbon reads "E PLURIBUS UNUM" (this is the motto of the U.S.A. and means "Out of Many, One" - and refers to the states of the United States being united into one country). The eagle is holding seven arrows and an olive branch (with three red berries) in its talons. The arrows represent the defense of liberty, and the olive branch represents peace. The eagle has a red, whilte and blue shield on its body, with 13 stars (on a blue field) and 13 red and white stripes (representing the USA). Above the eagle are 13 yellow stars (representing the original 13 colonies of the USA) and a yellow fan. Under the eagle is a red scroll reading "NORTH DAKOTA."
North Dakota’s official flag was adopted in 1911. The flag has a blue field and pictures a bald eagle holding a red ribbon in its bill; the ribbon reads “E PLURIBUS UNUM” (this is the motto of the U.S.A. and means “Out of Many, One” – and refers to the states of the United States being united into one country). The eagle is holding seven arrows and an olive branch (with three red berries) in its talons. The arrows represent the defense of liberty, and the olive branch represents peace. The eagle has a red, whilte and blue shield on its body, with 13 stars (on a blue field) and 13 red and white stripes (representing the USA). Above the eagle are 13 yellow stars (representing the original 13 colonies of the USA) and a yellow fan. Under the eagle is a red scroll reading “NORTH DAKOTA.”

Author: Christopher Aiden-Lee Jackson

I am Professor of Basin Analysis @imperialcollege. I ❤️ 🏃🏿, 🚴🏿 and @basinsIC (⛏). I obsess about the tectono-stratigraphic development of sedimentary basins. Why? Because I'm hopeless at everything else.

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