GSA James B. Thompson Distinguished Lecture Tour Redux

Wow. Doesn’t time fly? It seems only days ago I returned from Leg 1 of my GSA James B. Thompson Distinguished Lecture Tour and yet, here I am, about to head off on Leg 2! Leg 1 was a whirlwind of super-awesome stuff; five institutions, thousands of kilometres of air travel, and several thousand calories, not to mention some spectacular (and massively unspectacular) runs. I met some lovely people, and saw and did some awesome things. I ate tacos on a Hawaiian beach, just before watching humpbacks from the edge of an extinct volcano. I took some photos. I rode a moped.

Leg 1 therefore set a very, very high bar, thus I have high expectations of Leg 2, which seems me taking in six institutions: (i) UT El Paso; (ii) University of Oregon; (iii) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (to give it its full name…); (iv) University of Connecticut; (v) Columbia and (vi) University of Arkansas. The schedule looks, quite frankly, ‘challenging’, involving one more institution than Leg 1, and involving some rather ‘zig-zaggy’ flights back-and-forth across the continent. I think I’m good for it and, amazingly, I have factored in some time for some fun and frolics with some of the Geo-Twitterati. But more, much, much more on that later.

Behind the scenes, in preparation for Leg 2, there has been lots of logistical hop-jumping involving lots of people; pick-ups and drop-offs at airports, accommodation, abstract tweaking and sending, etc. Thank God my four talks are already done and in the bag; I don’t think my nerves could handle it if they weren’t. As a reminder, I’ll be talking about normal faults, salt tectonics, application of 3D seismic reflection data to basin analysis, and seismic reflection imaging of igneous geology. But, as I found out during Leg 1, this tour isn’t simply about talking to people about science I find interesting; it’s also about meeting bright, passionate people and discussing their work. It’s about running. It’s about trying to keep on top of a blog that, at times, you resent. It’s largely about eating. Bring. It. On.

Author: Christopher Aiden-Lee Jackson

I am Professor of Basin Analysis @imperialcollege. I ❤️ 🏃🏿, 🚴🏿 and @basinsIC (⛏). I obsess about the tectono-stratigraphic development of sedimentary basins. Why? Because I'm hopeless at everything else.

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